All our products are developed in-house at our facilities in Eindhoven. Considered the Dutch Silicon Valley, the city is also home to Brainport, the High-Tech campus, the University of Technology Eindhoven, and the Design Academy. Having our headquarters in one of Europe’s leading high-tech areas we are able to continuously improve our products and to redefine the future of modern wheel building.

Our technical background and experience in professional cycling gave us a good understanding of how bicycle wheels should be developed and perform. However, to be able to compete with industry-leading brands we needed to gain more specific knowledge. For that reason, we started to look for development partners who were keen to push the boundaries of wheel building together with us. As a result, we were able to build a strong network: the key to our success.

There are different factors that determine the aerodynamic performance of a wheel. The main factors are, however, the rim depth and the rim shape. While it is widely known that deeper rims provide better airflow, it is their specific shape that defines the aerodynamic stability and as such, how a wheel feels when being ridden.

For the development of our R series wheels, we’ve done exactly that. We took to the road and simply rode. Together with a select group of athletes, we collected real ride wind data for more than one year. This allowed us to find out under which circumstances a wheel felt stable or unstable. We then made use of a detailed CFD analysis in partnership with the TU Eindhoven to define the characteristic 26mm U-shape rim profile of our R3, R4, and R5 models.

As part of the process, we designed the rim shape starting from the tire to allow the latter to perfectly fit and to also create a smooth airfoil between the two of them. We then verified our findings in the wind tunnel. Watch the video for a detailed explanation of the way we look to aerodynamics and how we applied this view on our wheel range.

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light

WEIGHT

The faculty of aerospace engineering at the TU Delft, The Netherlands, helped us to optimize our carbon lay-up in order to optimize the strength and stiffness of our wheels. We further developed our Local Reinforcement Technology together, with which we managed to reduce the weight of all our road and off-road models.

white paper

For rim brake wheels the temperatures reached can become as high as 280 degrees Celsius during prolonged heavy braking. Therefore, developing a brake surface that can handle temperatures up to that point without causing failure to the rim is crucial. Our R series rim brake models can handle the mentioned temperature point. In order to achieve this high level we developed our own resin. By using it in combination with a special production process we can ensure a consistent layup for the braking surface. Watch the video for a detailed explanation of our unique approach to brake performance.

white paper

EXTREME

DURABILITY

Durability is a key factor for the longevity of a hub. To be able to keep the bearings safe from dirt and water, we developed our own system. We cover the bearing sides next to the axle end-caps and use our own seals and grease inside the bearings. We do further use SKF industrial bearings as a standard and offer CeramicSpeed bearings as an upgrade. This, in total, helps us to optimize the durability of the hubs.

white paper

All Scope wheels are built as a system. To create a very high lateral stiffness while keeping an equal spoke tension, we optimized the flange distance of our hubs. A wide flange distance is essential since nearly 60 percent of the lateral stiffness are determined by the flange distance.

Other important aspects are the number of spokes, their thickness, and the stiffness of the rim. While the combination of amount and thickness of the spokes determines around 25 percent of a wheel’s overall lateral stiffness, the stiffness of the rim contributes another 15 percent.

The uniform lateral stiffness of our wheels is between 47-52 Nm/mm: A benchmark in the bicycle wheel market.

white paper

Scope Development Partners

All our products are developed in-house at our facilities in Eindhoven. Considered the Dutch Silicon Valley, the city is also home to Brainport, the High-Tech campus, the University of Technology Eindhoven, and the Design Academy. Having our headquarters in one of Europe’s leading high-tech areas we are able to continuously improve our products and to redefine the future of modern wheel building.

Our technical background and experience in professional cycling gave us a good understanding of how bicycle wheels should be developed and perform. However, to be able to compete with industry-leading brands we needed to gain more specific knowledge. For that reason, we started to look for development partners who were keen to push the boundaries of wheel building together with us. As a result, we were able to build a strong network: the key to our success.

There are different factors that determine the aerodynamic performance of a wheel. The main factors are, however, the rim depth and the rim shape. While it is widely known that deeper rims provide better airflow, it is their specific shape that defines the aerodynamic stability and as such, how a wheel feels when being ridden.

For the development of our R series wheels, we’ve done exactly that. We took to the road and simply rode. Together with a select group of athletes, we collected real ride wind data for more than one year. This allowed us to find out under which circumstances a wheel felt stable or unstable. We then made use of a detailed CFD analysis in partnership with the TU Eindhoven to define the characteristic 26mm U-shape rim profile of our R3, R4, and R5 models.

As part of the process, we designed the rim shape starting from the tire to allow the latter to perfectly fit and to also create a smooth airfoil between the two of them. We then verified our findings in the wind tunnel. Watch the video for a detailed explanation of the way we look to aerodynamics and how we applied this view on our wheel range.

WHITE PAPER

light

WEIGHT

The faculty of aerospace engineering at the TU Delft, The Netherlands, helped us to optimize our carbon lay-up in order to optimize the strength and stiffness of our wheels. We further developed our Local Reinforcement Technology together, with which we managed to reduce the weight of all our road and off-road models.

WHITE PAPER

For rim brake wheels the temperatures reached can become as high as 280 degrees Celsius during prolonged heavy braking. Therefore, developing a brake surface that can handle temperatures up to that point without causing failure to the rim is crucial. Our R series rim brake models can handle the mentioned temperature point. In order to achieve this high level we developed our own resin. By using it in combination with a special production process we can ensure a consistent layup for the braking surface. Watch the video for a detailed explanation of our unique approach to brake performance.

WHITE PAPER

EXTREME

DURABILITY

Durability is a key factor for the longevity of a hub. To be able to keep the bearings safe from dirt and water, we developed our own system. We cover the bearing sides next to the axle end-caps and use our own seals and grease inside the bearings. We do further use SKF industrial bearings as a standard and offer CeramicSpeed bearings as an upgrade. This, in total, helps us to optimize the durability of the hubs.

WHITE PAPER

All Scope wheels are built as a system. To create a very high lateral stiffness while keeping an equal spoke tension, we optimized the flange distance of our hubs. A wide flange distance is essential since nearly 60 percent of the lateral stiffness are determined by the flange distance.

Other important aspects are the number of spokes, their thickness, and the stiffness of the rim. While the combination of amount and thickness of the spokes determines around 25 percent of a wheel’s overall lateral stiffness, the stiffness of the rim contributes another 15 percent.

The uniform lateral stiffness of our wheels is between 47-52 Nm/mm: A benchmark in the bicycle wheel market.

white paper

Scope Development Partners

All our products are developed in-house at our facilities in Eindhoven. Considered the Dutch Silicon Valley, the city is also home to Brainport, the High-Tech campus, the University of Technology Eindhoven, and the Design Academy. Having our headquarters in one of Europe’s leading high-tech areas we are able to continuously improve our products and to redefine the future of modern wheel building.

Our technical background and experience in professional cycling gave us a good understanding of how bicycle wheels should be developed and perform. However, to be able to compete with industry-leading brands we needed to gain more specific knowledge. For that reason, we started to look for development partners who were keen to push the boundaries of wheel building together with us. As a result, we were able to build a strong network: the key to our success.

There are different factors that determine the aerodynamic performance of a wheel. The main factors are, however, the rim depth and the rim shape. While it is widely known that deeper rims provide better airflow, it is their specific shape that defines the aerodynamic stability and as such, how a wheel feels when being ridden.

For the development of our R series wheels, we’ve done exactly that. We took to the road and simply rode. Together with a select group of athletes, we collected real ride wind data for more than one year. This allowed us to find out under which circumstances a wheel felt stable or unstable. We then made use of a detailed CFD analysis in partnership with the TU Eindhoven to define the characteristic 26mm U-shape rim profile of our R3, R4, and R5 models.

As part of the process, we designed the rim shape starting from the tire to allow the latter to perfectly fit and to also create a smooth airfoil between the two of them. We then verified our findings in the wind tunnel. Watch the video for a detailed explanation of the way we look to aerodynamics and how we applied this view on our wheel range.

white paper

light

WEIGHT

The faculty of aerospace engineering at the TU Delft, The Netherlands, helped us to optimize our carbon lay-up in order to optimize the strength and stiffness of our wheels. We further developed our Local Reinforcement Technology together, with which we managed to reduce the weight of all our road and off-road models.

white paper

For rim brake wheels the temperatures reached can become as high as 280 degrees Celsius during prolonged heavy braking. Therefore, developing a brake surface that can handle temperatures up to that point without causing failure to the rim is crucial. Our R series rim brake models can handle the mentioned temperature point. In order to achieve this high level we developed our own resin. By using it in combination with a special production process we can ensure a consistent layup for the braking surface. Watch the video for a detailed explanation of our unique approach to brake performance.

white paper

EXTREME

DURABILITY

Durability is a key factor for the longevity of a hub. To be able to keep the bearings safe from dirt and water, we developed our own system. We cover the bearing sides next to the axle end-caps and use our own seals and grease inside the bearings. We do further use SKF industrial bearings as a standard and offer CeramicSpeed bearings as an upgrade. This, in total, helps us to optimize the durability of the hubs.

white paper

All Scope wheels are built as a system. To create a very high lateral stiffness while keeping an equal spoke tension, we optimized the flange distance of our hubs. A wide flange distance is essential since nearly 60 percent of the lateral stiffness are determined by the flange distance.

Other important aspects are the number of spokes, their thickness, and the stiffness of the rim. While the combination of amount and thickness of the spokes determines around 25 percent of a wheel’s overall lateral stiffness, the stiffness of the rim contributes another 15 percent.

The uniform lateral stiffness of our wheels is between 47-52 Nm/mm: A benchmark in the bicycle wheel market.

white paper

Scope Development Partners