Pinning on a number: How to prepare yourself for your competitive highlight

Together with Calle Friberg we will provide you a couple of tips and tricks on how you can optimize your training. In this first article we’ll discuss the basics of preparing yourself for a long distance event, a MTB marathon in particular.

PINNING ON A NUMBER

HOW TO PREPARE YOURSELF FOR YOUR COMPETITIVE HIGHLIGHT

The 2019 season is about to take momentum. The first races are already history, both on and off the road. Some of you might already have tasted some early success. For most of us, however, the big goals still lay ahead.

Together with Calle Friberg, we will provide you a couple of tips and tricks on how you can optimize your training. In this first article, we’ll discuss the basics of preparing yourself for a long distance event, a MTB marathon in particular.

Have you ever thought about racing a MTB marathon event? Well, it’s not as difficult, as it might seem. And with the right preparation, you’ll get there. And even further: you’ll finish the event successfully. With the right training and equipment, you’ll reach that finish line!

There are two types of MTB marathon events: one-day events and stage races. Calle is a seasoned pro who has experience success both of them. The multiple Swedish national champion has won the Marathon World Series race Roc des Alpes and has finished races like the Cape Epic, and the Swiss Epic on numerous occasions.

Defining the goals and sharpening the focus

Not everyone likes to focus on data at all time. Doing so can add a lot of pressure. However, this article aims to give you an overview of what can be done to reach your goals. No matter if these are set around crossing the line at the front of the pack, or just around finishing the race. In the end, it shall provide you with a certain training structure, with notes about different training aspects. And it shall show you that and how it’s possible to train for long-distance events, even with your normal working hours.

The agenda outlined in this article is fairly uncomplicated. It only requires your commitment to training hours and intensity. But before looking at it in more detail, let’s emphasize on a few key points.

While it’s one story to stay fit throughout the year, it’s another when it comes to racing. Pick your key event and then start planning your training around it. Once you know the date, start to plan your training. To get the most out of yourself come race day, start your specific training at least 12 weeks in advance and try to combine your long rides with some technical exercises. Also, find a good rhythm and structure for your interval sessions and mix-up sessions on the turbo trainer with sessions on the road.

There’s no golden rule to be successful come race-day. There are too many variables involved that can spoil a great result. That doesn’t mean, though, that one can’t try to be as prepared as possible. Once decided, try to stick to your training plan. Even if this means that you have to face bad weather. Who knows what conditions race day will bring?

You should also make sure to try out your intended race nutrition on longer rides to find out what works for you and what not. Lastly, make the right investment choices. Investing in good equipment can be a game changer. A good frameset or purpose-built wheelset can be a game changer. One, that you’ll likely be glad about when the adrenaline kicks in and it’s go-time.

Training with normal working hours

As already mentioned, this article tries to provide you with an overview of what you can do. It does, though, not replace a coach.

Competing while working normal hours during the week can be challenging. Not everyone has the luxurious situation of having 20 hours available to hone the form. It is, therefore, that you’ll find two options in the table below. Depending on how much time you have available, these will serve as a guide.

Most of the turbo sessions below are based around interval sessions. A suitable interval for zone 2 sessions is a so-called power pyramid. For zone 3 sessions over-under intervals are a great way to improve your fitness levels. Make sure you find a good mix that works for you.

DOWNLOAD THE PLAN

Test yourself

Some literature recommends to start your training blocks with a test, often referring to a FTP-test to find out your functional threshold power, or in other words, to find out the power level that you can sustain for 1 hour. While this is a good indicator to figure out your training zones, you shouldn’t underestimate your heart rate. Also, if you don’t have, want or can afford a powermeter, try to make use of your heart-rate monitor. It’ll pay off on your way to the start line.

(By the way, if you prefer to race on the road. The tips given in this article will also help you to get through any road race you’ll take to the start.)

 

Calle Friberg’s bike

Frame: Scott Spark RC

Groupset: Sram Eagle XX1

Wheels: Scope O2

Tires: Maxxis

Images: Sportograf

Featured Products: Scope O2

PINNING ON A NUMBER

HOW TO PREPARE YOURSELF FOR YOUR COMPETITIVE HIGHLIGHT

The 2019 season is about to take momentum. The first races are already history, both on and off the road. Some of you might already have tasted some early success. For most of us, however, the big goals still lay ahead.

Together with Calle Friberg, we will provide you a couple of tips and tricks on how you can optimize your training. In this first article, we’ll discuss the basics of preparing yourself for a long distance event, a MTB marathon in particular.

Have you ever thought about racing a MTB marathon event? Well, it’s not as difficult, as it might seem. And with the right preparation, you’ll get there. And even further: you’ll finish the event successfully. With the right training and equipment, you’ll reach that finish line!

There are two types of MTB marathon events: one-day events and stage races. Calle is a seasoned pro who has experience success both of them. The multiple Swedish national champion has won the Marathon World Series race Roc des Alpes and has finished races like the Cape Epic, and the Swiss Epic on numerous occasions.

Defining the goals and sharpening the focus

Not everyone likes to focus on data at all time. Doing so can add a lot of pressure. However, this article aims to give you an overview of what can be done to reach your goals. No matter if these are set around crossing the line at the front of the pack, or just around finishing the race. In the end, it shall provide you with a certain training structure, with notes about different training aspects. And it shall show you that and how it’s possible to train for long-distance events, even with your normal working hours.

The agenda outlined in this article is fairly uncomplicated. It only requires your commitment to training hours and intensity. But before looking at it in more detail, let’s emphasize on a few key points.

While it’s one story to stay fit throughout the year, it’s another when it comes to racing. Pick your key event and then start planning your training around it. Once you know the date, start to plan your training. To get the most out of yourself come race day, start your specific training at least 12 weeks in advance and try to combine your long rides with some technical exercises. Also, find a good rhythm and structure for your interval sessions and mix-up sessions on the turbo trainer with sessions on the road.

There’s no golden rule to be successful come race-day. There are too many variables involved that can spoil a great result. That doesn’t mean, though, that one can’t try to be as prepared as possible. Once decided, try to stick to your training plan. Even if this means that you have to face bad weather. Who knows what conditions race day will bring?

You should also make sure to try out your intended race nutrition on longer rides to find out what works for you and what not. Lastly, make the right investment choices. Investing in good equipment can be a game changer. A good frameset or purpose-built wheelset can be a game changer. One, that you’ll likely be glad about when the adrenaline kicks in and it’s go-time.

Training with normal working hours

As already mentioned, this article tries to provide you with an overview of what you can do. It does, though, not replace a coach.

Competing while working normal hours during the week can be challenging. Not everyone has the luxurious situation of having 20 hours available to hone the form. It is, therefore, that you’ll find two options in the table below. Depending on how much time you have available, these will serve as a guide.

Most of the turbo sessions below are based around interval sessions. A suitable interval for zone 2 sessions is a so-called power pyramid. For zone 3 sessions over-under intervals are a great way to improve your fitness levels. Make sure you find a good mix that works for you.

DOWNLOAD THE PLAN

Test yourself

Some literature recommends to start your training blocks with a test, often referring to a FTP-test to find out your functional threshold power, or in other words, to find out the power level that you can sustain for 1 hour. While this is a good indicator to figure out your training zones, you shouldn’t underestimate your heart rate. Also, if you don’t have, want or can afford a powermeter, try to make use of your heart-rate monitor. It’ll pay off on your way to the start line.

(By the way, if you prefer to race on the road. The tips given in this article will also help you to get through any road race you’ll take to the start.)

 

Calle Friberg’s bike

Frame: Scott Spark RC

Groupset: Sram Eagle XX1

Wheels: Scope O2

Tires: Maxxis

Images: Sportograf

Featured Products: Scope O2

PINNING ON A NUMBER

HOW TO PREPARE YOURSELF FOR YOUR COMPETITIVE HIGHLIGHT

The 2019 season is about to take momentum. The first races are already history, both on and off the road. Some of you might already have tasted some early success. For most of us, however, the big goals still lay ahead.

Together with Calle Friberg, we will provide you a couple of tips and tricks on how you can optimize your training. In this first article, we’ll discuss the basics of preparing yourself for a long distance event, a MTB marathon in particular.

Have you ever thought about racing a MTB marathon event? Well, it’s not as difficult, as it might seem. And with the right preparation, you’ll get there. And even further: you’ll finish the event successfully. With the right training and equipment, you’ll reach that finish line!

There are two types of MTB marathon events: one-day events and stage races. Calle is a seasoned pro who has experience success both of them. The multiple Swedish national champion has won the Marathon World Series race Roc des Alpes and has finished races like the Cape Epic, and the Swiss Epic on numerous occasions.

Defining the goals and sharpening the focus

Not everyone likes to focus on data at all time. Doing so can add a lot of pressure. However, this article aims to give you an overview of what can be done to reach your goals. No matter if these are set around crossing the line at the front of the pack, or just around finishing the race. In the end, it shall provide you with a certain training structure, with notes about different training aspects. And it shall show you that and how it’s possible to train for long-distance events, even with your normal working hours.

The agenda outlined in this article is fairly uncomplicated. It only requires your commitment to training hours and intensity. But before looking at it in more detail, let’s emphasize on a few key points.

While it’s one story to stay fit throughout the year, it’s another when it comes to racing. Pick your key event and then start planning your training around it. Once you know the date, start to plan your training. To get the most out of yourself come race day, start your specific training at least 12 weeks in advance and try to combine your long rides with some technical exercises. Also, find a good rhythm and structure for your interval sessions and mix-up sessions on the turbo trainer with sessions on the road.

There’s no golden rule to be successful come race-day. There are too many variables involved that can spoil a great result. That doesn’t mean, though, that one can’t try to be as prepared as possible. Once decided, try to stick to your training plan. Even if this means that you have to face bad weather. Who knows what conditions race day will bring?

You should also make sure to try out your intended race nutrition on longer rides to find out what works for you and what not. Lastly, make the right investment choices. Investing in good equipment can be a game changer. A good frameset or purpose-built wheelset can be a game changer. One, that you’ll likely be glad about when the adrenaline kicks in and it’s go-time.

Training with normal working hours

As already mentioned, this article tries to provide you with an overview of what you can do. It does, though, not replace a coach.

Competing while working normal hours during the week can be challenging. Not everyone has the luxurious situation of having 20 hours available to hone the form. It is, therefore, that you’ll find two options in the table below. Depending on how much time you have available, these will serve as a guide.

Most of the turbo sessions below are based around interval sessions. A suitable interval for zone 2 sessions is a so-called power pyramid. For zone 3 sessions over-under intervals are a great way to improve your fitness levels. Make sure you find a good mix that works for you.

DOWNLOAD THE PLAN

Test yourself

Some literature recommends to start your training blocks with a test, often referring to a FTP-test to find out your functional threshold power, or in other words, to find out the power level that you can sustain for 1 hour. While this is a good indicator to figure out your training zones, you shouldn’t underestimate your heart rate. Also, if you don’t have, want or can afford a powermeter, try to make use of your heart-rate monitor. It’ll pay off on your way to the start line.

(By the way, if you prefer to race on the road. The tips given in this article will also help you to get through any road race you’ll take to the start.)

 

Calle Friberg’s bike

Frame: Scott Spark RC

Groupset: Sram Eagle XX1

Wheels: Scope O2

Tires: Maxxis

Images: Sportograf

Featured Products: Scope O2