Omloop Het Nieuwsblad and the tubeless approach of Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles

Last Saturday, Cycling Team Wallonie Bruxelles became the first team to race a World Tour classic on a tubeless setup. All riders committed to the new technology, having been able to test is throughout the earlier part of the season.

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad

The Tubeless Approach of Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles

“Cycling is coming home.” At least that is what a lot of people were saying ahead of Omloop Het Nieuwsblad. The Belgian classic marks the traditional opener to the cobbled season. Given its World Tour status, the race attracts the strongest classics riders of the peloton, as it gives them the chance to test their legs against each other on their preferred terrain for the first time of the season. 

In the end, Zdenek Stybar of Deceuninck-QuickStep outfoxed his rivals to take the win from an elite group that also included Olympic champion Greg van Avermaet of CCC. And while the big teams and their captains were the expected ones to shine, it was Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles that left its mark on the race. 

The small Belgian team received a wildcard to race the iconic Omloop Het Nieuwsblad, but wasn’t shy to place neo-professional Tom Wirtgen in the early break. The 23-year old stayed away for nearly 150 kilometers. And with roughly 50 kilometers to go, he helped launch the solo attack of Baptiste Planckaert. The latter would end up in 24th position, finishing together with former winner Ian Stannard of Sky, less than 2 minutes behind solo winner Stybar.

The team rode attentively all day and what makes their effort even more remarkable is the fact that they raced tubeless. As the first team to completely do so at a World Tour race.

Having been able to test the system over the last couple of months, the team knew which tire pressures to use when hitting the cobbles. And it gave them added confidence. Should one of the riders puncture, he’d be able to continue racing for a while, thus staying in the race and keep the chances for the team high.

Cycling Team Wallonie Bruxelles races on our tubeless optimized Scope R4c and R5c wheels.

Kristof Ramon was there for us to capture the race for us. 

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad

The Tubeless Approach of Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles

“Cycling is coming home.” At least that is what a lot of people were saying ahead of Omloop Het Nieuwsblad. The Belgian classic marks the traditional opener to the cobbled season. Given its World Tour status, the race attracts the strongest classics riders of the peloton, as it gives them the chance to test their legs against each other on their preferred terrain for the first time of the season. 

In the end, Zdenek Stybar of Deceuninck-QuickStep outfoxed his rivals to take the win from an elite group that also included Olympic champion Greg van Avermaet of CCC. And while the big teams and their captains were the expected ones to shine, it was Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles that left its mark on the race. 

The small Belgian team received a wildcard to race the iconic Omloop Het Nieuwsblad, but wasn’t shy to place neo-professional Tom Wirtgen in the early break. The 23-year old stayed away for nearly 150 kilometers. And with roughly 50 kilometers to go, he helped launch the solo attack of Baptiste Planckaert. The latter would end up in 24th position, finishing together with former winner Ian Stannard of Sky, less than 2 minutes behind solo winner Stybar.

The team rode attentively all day and what makes their effort even more remarkable is the fact that they raced tubeless. As the first team to completely do so at a World Tour race.

Having been able to test the system over the last couple of months, the team knew which tire pressures to use when hitting the cobbles. And it gave them added confidence. Should one of the riders puncture, he’d be able to continue racing for a while, thus staying in the race and keep the chances for the team high.

Cycling Team Wallonie Bruxelles races on our tubeless optimized Scope R4c and R5c wheels.

Kristof Ramon was there for us to capture the race for us. 

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad

The Tubeless Approach of Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles

“Cycling is coming home.” At least that is what a lot of people were saying ahead of Omloop Het Nieuwsblad. The Belgian classic marks the traditional opener to the cobbled season. Given its World Tour status, the race attracts the strongest classics riders of the peloton, as it gives them the chance to test their legs against each other on their preferred terrain for the first time of the season. 

In the end, Zdenek Stybar of Deceuninck-QuickStep outfoxed his rivals to take the win from an elite group that also included Olympic champion Greg van Avermaet of CCC. And while the big teams and their captains were the expected ones to shine, it was Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles that left its mark on the race. 

The small Belgian team received a wildcard to race the iconic Omloop Het Nieuwsblad, but wasn’t shy to place neo-professional Tom Wirtgen in the early break. The 23-year old stayed away for nearly 150 kilometers. And with roughly 50 kilometers to go, he helped launch the solo attack of Baptiste Planckaert. The latter would end up in 24th position, finishing together with former winner Ian Stannard of Sky, less than 2 minutes behind solo winner Stybar.

The team rode attentively all day and what makes their effort even more remarkable is the fact that they raced tubeless. As the first team to completely do so at a World Tour race.

Having been able to test the system over the last couple of months, the team knew which tire pressures to use when hitting the cobbles. And it gave them added confidence. Should one of the riders puncture, he’d be able to continue racing for a while, thus staying in the race and keep the chances for the team high.

Cycling Team Wallonie Bruxelles races on our tubeless optimized Scope R4c and R5c wheels.

Kristof Ramon was there for us to capture the race for us.