Feeling the heat: Racing fixed across the globe

Biehler-Il Magistrale is a Dutch fixed gear crit team that has its origin in the highly successful Team Wit. The group of five travels the globe, from Amsterdam to Hamburg, and from Zurich to San Francisco, to not only take part in the most iconic and renown fixed gear crit events, but also, and equally important, to spread the lifestyle that makes the scene the one it is: a pumping and ever-thriving one.

Feeling the heat

Racing fixed across the globe

Biehler-Il Magistrale is a Dutch fixed gear crit team that has its origin in the highly successful Team Wit. The group of five travels the globe, from Amsterdam to Hamburg, and from Zurich to San Francisco, to not only take part in the most iconic and renown fixed gear crit events, but also, and equally important, to spread the lifestyle that makes the scene the one it is: a pumping and ever-thriving one.

Scope sponsors the team since its early beginnings. The collaboration has helped us to further develop our already race-proven rim and disc-brake rims and hub. And it keeps us connected to the scene.

Getting started

Fixed gear crits have a unique character and charm. Arguably, they’re also the most accessible of all cycling disciplines if one wants to pick up racing. And probably the most affordable one. From an equipment point of view, one only needs a fixed gear bike, a set of wheels, pedals and a suitable kit and helmet to take to the start of any given midweek crit. From there one can progress through the ranks and also take part in bigger events. It’s easy to see, that, in theory, the effort one needs to make to get started is a lot more uncomplicated in comparison with other cycling disciplines.   

The bike

All of the guys at Biehler-Il Magistrale have started that way. However, their first, relatively inexpensive, race bikes are a far cry from their current ones.

This year the team races custom-made Titici F-RT01 track frames, hand-sprayed by famous Italian painter Tony Spray. To match the outstanding artwork of the frame, we have designed custom decals for the R5 wheels the guys are using.

The bike is further spec’d with Ritchey cockpits, Ere Research saddles and bar tape and Lezyne computers.

The events

Besides a handful of local races, Biehler-Il Magistrale races some of the most iconic events of the international fixed-gear crit calendar. Starting from the Mission Crit in San Francisco, USA, the team also frequently travels abroad in Europe. Having raced the Fixed Nations Cup in Dijon, France, the Waterkant Crit in Hamburg, Germany and the Frit Crit in Lombeek, the Netherlands, this summer, the team recently went to Zurich, Switzerland, to take to the start at the ZuriCrit, as a preparation to challenge the overall of the Dutch crit league in the weeks to come.

Making the difference, tubeless.

No Excuse.

Biehler-Il Magistrale uses the following products

Scope Wheel Bag

The Scope wheel bag is made of sturdy nylon and features two separate compartments, thus offering enough space for both your front and rear wheel. 

49,00 EUR

Scope Tubeless Rim Tape

Scope tubeless rim tape helps you to securely seal the rims of your Scope wheels when installing tubeless tires.

24,95 EUR

Photography by Jelmer Broekstra

Feeling the heat

Racing fixed across the globe

Biehler-Il Magistrale is a Dutch fixed gear crit team that has its origin in the highly successful Team Wit. The group of five travels the globe, from Amsterdam to Hamburg, and from Zurich to San Francisco, to not only take part in the most iconic and renown fixed gear crit events, but also, and equally important, to spread the lifestyle that makes the scene the one it is: a pumping and ever-thriving one.

Scope sponsors the team since its early beginnings. The collaboration has helped us to further develop our already race-proven rim and disc-brake rims and hub. And it keeps us connected to the scene.

Getting started

Fixed gear crits have a unique character and charm. Arguably, they’re also the most accessible of all cycling disciplines if one wants to pick up racing. And probably the most affordable one. From an equipment point of view, one only needs a fixed gear bike, a set of wheels, pedals and a suitable kit and helmet to take to the start of any given midweek crit. From there one can progress through the ranks and also take part in bigger events. It’s easy to see, that, in theory, the effort one needs to make to get started is a lot more uncomplicated in comparison with other cycling disciplines.   

The bike

All of the guys at Biehler-Il Magistrale have started that way. However, their first, relatively inexpensive, race bikes are a far cry from their current ones.

This year the team races custom-made Titici F-RT01 track frames, hand-sprayed by famous Italian painter Tony Spray. To match the outstanding artwork of the frame, we have designed custom decals for the R5 wheels the guys are using.

The bike is further spec’d with Ritchey cockpits, Ere Research saddles and bar tape and Lezyne computers.

The events

Besides a handful of local races, Biehler-Il Magistrale races some of the most iconic events of the international fixed-gear crit calendar. Starting from the Mission Crit in San Francisco, USA, the team also frequently travels abroad in Europe. Having raced the Fixed Nations Cup in Dijon, France, the Waterkant Crit in Hamburg, Germany and the Frit Crit in Lombeek, the Netherlands, this summer, the team recently went to Zurich, Switzerland, to take to the start at the ZuriCrit, as a preparation to challenge the overall of the Dutch crit league in the weeks to come.

Making the difference, tubeless.

No Excuse.

Biehler-Il Magistrale uses the following products

Scope Wheel Bag

The Scope wheel bag is made of sturdy nylon and features two separate compartments, thus offering enough space for both your front and rear wheel. 

49,00 EUR

Tubeless Rim Tape

Scope tubeless rim tape helps you to securely seal the rims of your Scope wheels when installing tubeless tires.

24,95 EUR

Photography by Jelmer Broekstra

Feeling the heat

Racing fixed across the globe

Biehler-Il Magistrale is a Dutch fixed gear crit team that has its origin in the highly successful Team Wit. The group of five travels the globe, from Amsterdam to Hamburg, and from Zurich to San Francisco, to not only take part in the most iconic and renown fixed gear crit events, but also, and equally important, to spread the lifestyle that makes the scene the one it is: a pumping and ever-thriving one.

Scope sponsors the team since its early beginnings. The collaboration has helped us to further develop our already race-proven rim and disc-brake rims and hub. And it keeps us connected to the scene.

Getting started

Fixed gear crits have a unique character and charm. Arguably, they’re also the most accessible of all cycling disciplines if one wants to pick up racing. And probably the most affordable one. From an equipment point of view, one only needs a fixed gear bike, a set of wheels, pedals and a suitable kit and helmet to take to the start of any given midweek crit. From there one can progress through the ranks and also take part in bigger events. It’s easy to see, that, in theory, the effort one needs to make to get started is a lot more uncomplicated in comparison with other cycling disciplines.   

The bike

All of the guys at Biehler-Il Magistrale have started that way. However, their first, relatively inexpensive, race bikes are a far cry from their current ones.

This year the team races custom-made Titici F-RT01 track frames, hand-sprayed by famous Italian painter Tony Spray. To match the outstanding artwork of the frame, we have designed custom decals for the R5 wheels the guys are using.

The bike is further spec’d with Ritchey cockpits, Ere Research saddles and bar tape and Lezyne computers.

The events

Besides a handful of local races, Biehler-Il Magistrale races some of the most iconic events of the international fixed-gear crit calendar. Starting from the Mission Crit in San Francisco, USA, the team also frequently travels abroad in Europe. Having raced the Fixed Nations Cup in Dijon, France, the Waterkant Crit in Hamburg, Germany and the Frit Crit in Lombeek, the Netherlands, this summer, the team recently went to Zurich, Switzerland, to take to the start at the ZuriCrit, as a preparation to challenge the overall of the Dutch crit league in the weeks to come.

Making the difference, tubeless.

No Excuse.

Biehler-Il Magistrale uses the following products

Scope Wheel Bag

The Scope wheel bag is made of sturdy nylon and features two separate compartments, thus offering enough space for both your front and rear wheel. 

49,00 EUR

Photography by Jelmer Broekstra

Experiencing off-road: How to get the most out of your tubeless Scope O2 wheels

Swedish MTB stalwart Calle Friberg is a well-known figure in professional mountain biking. He’s been at the start line of nearly every renown race one can think of, from XCO World Cups to the Cape Epic. Over the years he has gained invaluable experience. Also when it comes to product choice. Together with him, we would like to give you a few tips on how you can run your tubeless wheels.

Experiencing Off-Road

How to get the most out of your tubeless Scope O2D wheels

Swedish MTB stalwart Calle Friberg is a well-known figure in professional mountain biking. He’s been at the start line of nearly every renown race one can think of, from XCO World Cups to the Cape Epic. Over the years he has gained invaluable experience. Also when it comes to product choice.  

We’re proud to work with Calle. Besides putting the Scope O2D through their paces, he also provides us with valuable feedback to make our products even better.

Calle rides his O2D tubeless. Of course. And together with him, we would like to give you a few tips on how you can run your tubeless wheels.

Why Tubeless

Before going into detail, let’s start with a few brief points on why you should choose to ride tubeless.

Since a couple of years, tubeless tires are gaining ground in mountain biking and have become the state of the art in the competitive side of the sport. For a good reason. If paired with a tubeless optimized wheelset, tubeless tires are a lot more puncture proof than tires with an inner tube.

Tubeless tires seal on the rim interface. The right fit easily makes the system airtight. Adding sealant helps to prevent air leakage, in case of punctures. And, for example, it eliminates the risk of pinch flats.

Adding to this, running a tubeless system will offer you more comfort and control when riding. You can run tubeless tires with much less pressure than tires that are paired with an inner tube. Tubeless tires also feature a minimized rolling resistance, meaning that you can go faster without an increased effort.

There are a lot more benefits in running a tubeless system on a mountain bike. “I wouldn’t ride with an inner tube anymore”, says Calle. “Inner tubes are just for emergency.”

Tire Choice

An important factor for a well-performing tubeless system is the choice of tires. While it is possible to run nearly any tire without an inner tube, it is recommendable to use a tubeless specific tire. We have developed the rim interface of our O2D wheels in close collaboration with Schwalbe. The German tire manufacturer has been on the forefront of tubeless tire development and has been pushing the boundaries of this technology ever since they started to introduce their first tubeless models.

However, there are more manufacturers that offer tubeless specific tires. Being sponsored by Maxxis, Calle runs a mix of their XC specific tires, namely the Aspen and the Rekon Race, depending on the terrain and condition he’s going to ride in.  

The Scope O2D rims feature an outer width of 31 millimeters and an inner width of 25 millimeters, with the wheelset weighing in at 1.380 grams. A wider rim benefits the comfort and stability of the system, while a low weight and high lateral stiffness helps the responsiveness.

“Compared to traditional rims, the O2D rims are a little bit wider. I like that, since it helps the fit of my tires and also slightly increases the volume.”

There are obvious differences regarding the discipline. “For XCO races I choose 2.25” tires with more knobs as they offer more grip. But it really depends on the weather condition and surface. For XC marathon races it can be a little different. At the recent Swiss Epic I used Recon Race 2.35″ tires to increase the comfort on the challenging course.”

Also, depending on the terrain and surface, one might select different tires; either on the front or the rear, or even on both front and rear. “I often use Aspen 2.25” at the rear and Rekon Race 2.25” at the front. In wet conditions I switch to the Rekon Race at the rear as well. If the course is fast and totally dry, then the Aspen 2.25” is my go-to-choice for both front and rear.”  

Tire Pressure

It’s not always easy to choose the best suitable tire for a specific terrain and surface. There’s always a tire that one prefers and that, in combination with the optimal pressure, can do wonders when it counts.

“On XC courses I normally opt to ride a mix of Rekon Race 2.25” EXO and Aspen 2.25” EXO tires, which I pump up to around 1.3 to 1.4 bar. In wet conditions or when the course features a several root sections and rock gardens, I go down to 1.2 bar.”

That, however, is only half the story. Calle weighs 68 kilograms and as a seasoned XC marathon rider he also knows that one can ride with a higher pressure, if the course allows it.

“For a couple of super-fast XC marathon races in Norway and Sweden, which normally only feature gravel roads I pump my tires up to around 1.5 to 1.6 bars.”    

Surging Up

Tire choice and pressure always depends on different aspects. Weather conditions, surface and body weight are just three of them. There is, without a doubt, no reason not to use tubeless tires when it comes to cross country mountain biking. Especially when they’re paired with a tubeless optimized rim. The pro’s just simply outweigh the con’s. While one might have some troubles to set up a tubeless system at first, one will quickly adapt to it. Once set and ready it’s time to simply enjoy a (nearly) hassle-free time on the trails. No matter how challenging they are.

Calle uses the following products

Scope O2D

The Scope O2D is the perfect choice for any cross country course, no matter how challenging it is.

From 1.398,00 EUR

CeramicSpeed Upgrade

CeramicSpeed bearings are known for their low friction and durability. Ride faster longer.

500,00 EUR

Photography by Karen M. Edwards and Torsten Christensen

Experiencing Off-Road

How to get the most out of your tubeless Scope O2D wheels

Swedish MTB stalwart Calle Friberg is a well-known figure in professional mountain biking. He’s been at the start line of nearly every renown race one can think of, from XCO World Cups to the Cape Epic. Over the years he has gained invaluable experience. Also when it comes to product choice.  

We’re proud to work with Calle. Besides putting the Scope O2D through their paces, he also provides us with valuable feedback to make our products even better.

Calle rides his O2D tubeless. Of course. And together with him, we would like to give you a few tips on how you can run your tubeless wheels.

Why Tubeless

Before going into detail, let’s start with a few brief points on why you should choose to ride tubeless.

Since a couple of years, tubeless tires are gaining ground in mountain biking and have become the state of the art in the competitive side of the sport. For a good reason. If paired with a tubeless optimized wheelset, tubeless tires are a lot more puncture proof than tires with an inner tube.

Tubeless tires seal on the rim interface. The right fit easily makes the system airtight. Adding sealant helps to prevent air leakage, in case of punctures. And, for example, it eliminates the risk of pinch flats.

Adding to this, running a tubeless system will offer you more comfort and control when riding. You can run tubeless tires with much less pressure than tires that are paired with an inner tube. Tubeless tires also feature a minimized rolling resistance, meaning that you can go faster without an increased effort.

There are a lot more benefits in running a tubeless system on a mountain bike. “I wouldn’t ride with an inner tube anymore”, says Calle. “Inner tubes are just for emergency.”

Tire Choice

An important factor for a well-performing tubeless system is the choice of tires. While it is possible to run nearly any tire without an inner tube, it is recommendable to use a tubeless specific tire. We have developed the rim interface of our O2D wheels in close collaboration with Schwalbe. The German tire manufacturer has been on the forefront of tubeless tire development and has been pushing the boundaries of this technology ever since they started to introduce their first tubeless models.

However, there are more manufacturers that offer tubeless specific tires. Being sponsored by Maxxis, Calle runs a mix of their XC specific tires, namely the Aspen and the Rekon Race, depending on the terrain and condition he’s going to ride in.  

The Scope O2D rims feature an outer width of 31 millimeters and an inner width of 25 millimeters, with the wheelset weighing in at 1.380 grams. A wider rim benefits the comfort and stability of the system, while a low weight and high lateral stiffness helps the responsiveness.

“Compared to traditional rims, the O2D rims are a little bit wider. I like that, since it helps the fit of my tires and also slightly increases the volume.”

There are obvious differences regarding the discipline. “For XCO races I choose 2.25” tires with more knobs as they offer more grip. But it really depends on the weather condition and surface. For XC marathon races it can be a little different.”

There are obvious differences regarding the discipline. “For XCO races I choose 2.25” tires with more knobs as they offer more grip. But it really depends on the weather condition and surface. For XC marathon races it can be a little different. At the recent Swiss Epic I used Recon Race 2.35″ tires to increase the comfort on the challenging course.”

Also, depending on the terrain and surface, one might select different tires; either on the front or the rear, or even on both front and rear. “I often use Aspen 2.25” at the rear and Rekon Race 2.25” at the front. In wet conditions I switch to the Rekon Race at the rear as well. If the course is fast and totally dry, then the Aspen 2.25” is my go-to-choice for both front and rear.”  

Tire Pressure

It’s not always easy to choose the best suitable tire for a specific terrain and surface. There’s always a tire that one prefers and that, in combination with the optimal pressure, can do wonders when it counts.

“On XC courses I normally opt to ride a mix of Rekon Race 2.25” EXO and Aspen 2.25” EXO tires, which I pump up to around 1.3 to 1.4 bar. In wet conditions or when the course features a several root sections and rock gardens, I go down to 1.2 bar.”

That, however, is only half the story. Calle weighs 68 kilograms and as a seasoned XC marathon rider he also knows that one can ride with a higher pressure, if the course allows it.

“For a couple of super-fast XC marathon races in Norway and Sweden, which normally only feature gravel roads I pump my tires up to around 1.5 to 1.6 bars.”    

Surging Up

Tire choice and pressure always depends on different aspects. Weather conditions, surface and body weight are just three of them. There is, without a doubt, no reason not to use tubeless tires when it comes to cross country mountain biking. Especially when they’re paired with a tubeless optimized rim. The pro’s just simply outweigh the con’s. While one might have some troubles to set up a tubeless system at first, one will quickly adapt to it. Once set and ready it’s time to simply enjoy a (nearly) hassle-free time on the trails. No matter how challenging they are.

Calle uses the following products

Scope O2D

The Scope O2D is the perfect choice for any cross country course, no matter how challenging it is.

From 1.398,00 EUR

CeramicSpeed Upgrade

CeramicSpeed bearings are known for their low friction and durability. Ride faster longer. 

500,00 EUR

Photography by Sportograf and Kjell Friberg

Experiencing Off-Road

How to get the most out of your tubeless Scope O2D wheels

Swedish MTB stalwart Calle Friberg is a well-known figure in professional mountain biking. He’s been at the start line of nearly every renown race one can think of, from XCO World Cups to the Cape Epic. Over the years he has gained invaluable experience. Also when it comes to product choice.  

We’re proud to work with Calle. Besides putting the Scope O2D through their paces, he also provides us with valuable feedback to make our products even better.

Calle rides his O2D tubeless. Of course. And together with him, we would like to give you a few tips on how you can run your tubeless wheels.

Why Tubeless

Before going into detail, let’s start with a few brief points on why you should choose to ride tubeless.

Since a couple of years, tubeless tires are gaining ground in mountain biking and have become the state of the art in the competitive side of the sport. For a good reason. If paired with a tubeless optimized wheelset, tubeless tires are a lot more puncture proof than tires with an inner tube.

Tubeless tires seal on the rim interface. The right fit easily makes the system airtight. Adding sealant helps to prevent air leakage, in case of punctures. And, for example, it eliminates the risk of pinch flats.

Adding to this, running a tubeless system will offer you more comfort and control when riding. You can run tubeless tires with much less pressure than tires that are paired with an inner tube. Tubeless tires also feature a minimized rolling resistance, meaning that you can go faster without an increased effort.

There are a lot more benefits in running a tubeless system on a mountain bike. “I wouldn’t ride with an inner tube anymore”, says Calle. “Inner tubes are just for emergency.”

Tire Choice

An important factor for a well-performing tubeless system is the choice of tires. While it is possible to run nearly any tire without an inner tube, it is recommendable to use a tubeless specific tire. We have developed the rim interface of our O2D wheels in close collaboration with Schwalbe. The German tire manufacturer has been on the forefront of tubeless tire development and has been pushing the boundaries of this technology ever since they started to introduce their first tubeless models.

However, there are more manufacturers that offer tubeless specific tires. Being sponsored by Maxxis, Calle runs a mix of their XC specific tires, namely the Aspen and the Rekon Race, depending on the terrain and condition he’s going to ride in.  

The Scope O2D rims feature an outer width of 31 millimeters and an inner width of 25 millimeters, with the wheelset weighing in at 1.380 grams. A wider rim benefits the comfort and stability of the system, while a low weight and high lateral stiffness helps the responsiveness.

“Compared to traditional rims, the O2D rims are a little bit wider. I like that, since it helps the fit of my tires and also slightly increases the volume.”

There are obvious differences regarding the discipline. “For XCO races I choose 2.25” tires with more knobs as they offer more grip. But it really depends on the weather condition and surface. For XC marathon races it can be a little different. At the recent Swiss Epic I used Recon Race 2.35″ tires to increase the comfort on the challenging course.”

Also, depending on the terrain and surface, one might select different tires; either on the front or the rear, or even on both front and rear. “I often use Aspen 2.25” at the rear and Rekon Race 2.25” at the front. In wet conditions I switch to the Rekon Race at the rear as well. If the course is fast and totally dry, then the Aspen 2.25” is my go-to-choice for both front and rear.”  

Tire Pressure

It’s not always easy to choose the best suitable tire for a specific terrain and surface. There’s always a tire that one prefers and that, in combination with the optimal pressure, can do wonders when it counts.

“On XC courses I normally opt to ride a mix of Rekon Race 2.25” EXO and Aspen 2.25” EXO tires, which I pump up to around 1.3 to 1.4 bar. In wet conditions or when the course features a several root sections and rock gardens, I go down to 1.2 bar.”

That, however, is only half the story. Calle weighs 68 kilograms and as a seasoned XC marathon rider he also knows that one can ride with a higher pressure, if the course allows it.

“For a couple of super-fast XC marathon races in Norway and Sweden, which normally only feature gravel roads I pump my tires up to around 1.5 to 1.6 bars.”    

Surging Up

Tire choice and pressure always depends on different aspects. Weather conditions, surface and body weight are just three of them. There is, without a doubt, no reason not to use tubeless tires when it comes to cross country mountain biking. Especially when they’re paired with a tubeless optimized rim. The pro’s just simply outweigh the con’s. While one might have some troubles to set up a tubeless system at first, one will quickly adapt to it. Once set and ready it’s time to simply enjoy a (nearly) hassle-free time on the trails. No matter how challenging they are.

Calle uses the following products

Scope O2D

The Scope O2D is the perfect choice for any cross country course, no matter how challenging it is.

From 1.398,00 EUR

Photography by Sportograf and Kjell Friberg

Going the Distance: The natural necessity to shift the focus towards tubeless

Approaching the 2019 season, Riwal Readynez made a game changing decision when they chose to use a tubeless optimized wheel setup. And the statistics would prove that decision right.

Going the Distance

The natural necessity to shift the focus towards Tubeless

Hailing from Odense, Denmark, Riwal-Readynez has established itself as the strongest outfit in Scandinavia over the last couple of seasons. Since the beginning of the year, the team competes with a Professional Continental license. And it does so with quite some success.

One of the most notable performances came at the Tour de Yorkshire. Former Danish national road champion Alexander Kamp proved his pedigree when he outsprinted reigning Olympic Road Race champion Greg van Avermaet of CCC and Chris Lawless of Ineos to take the win on stage 3, thus putting himself up for a top5 finish in the overall classification of the race.

Another outstanding result is the victory of Andreas Strokbro at the u23 edition of the infamous Ronde van Vlaanderen.

These are only two of the notable results Riwal Readynez was able to score this season. However, they outline the team’s approach towards the races they take to the start. Whenever the riders pin a number on, they aim to be visible, to make the race, to take position and influence the final outcome.

Performance Aspects

To be able to perform well on the highest level of the sport, it needs a fair amount of aspects that need to be factored in and that set the frame for an optimal performance when it counts.

One of these key aspects is the equipment the team and its riders use. With riders from Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the Faroe Islands, the team clearly has a Scandinavian feel to it.

Given the often rainy and cold weather in the northern part of Europe, the riders know how important high quality wheels and puncture proof tires are. Everyone who has been able to go for a road spin in the wet in one of the riders home countries will certainly have experienced how easy it is to puncture with plenty of tiny flintstone splinters to be found on the tarmac. A hassle-free setup for Scandinavian roads is a reliable one for most roads in any other part of Europe. A crucial matter, especially at races.

New Focus

Approaching the 2019 season the team, therefore, made a game-changing decision. Together with the riders, the management chose to use a tubeless optimized wheel setup. And the statistics would prove that decision right. To date, the Riwal Readynez’s 16 professional riders have accumulated more than 60.000 race kilometers, or, in other words, have covered 1.5 times the length of the equator, and only had to lament 25 punctures along the way.

“Our riders are really happy with the setup. The tires have a lot more grip and the fit with the wheels is a not to underestimate part of that, especially with tubeless”, says Jesper Deluer, team mechanic of Riwal-Readynez. “We also have far fewer problems with punctures, than we’ve had in the past with tubular tires.”

The favorite wheelset of the team’s riders is the Scope R5c paired with Vredestein Fortezza Tubeless Ready tires. With a width of 25 millimeter, the tires fit perfectly into the tire bed of our tubeless optimized Scope rims.

“I really enjoy riding the Scope R5c together with the tubeless setup. The setup is a bit heavier than what I’m used to, but once you get some speed, they’re rolling like a dream”, states Torkil Veyhe, one of the teams key domestiques. And Swedish National Road Race champion Lucas Eriksson adds: “I think the wheels are really good, and it’s very exciting to be riding tubeless. The handling of the wheels feels very, very good!”

The R5c has received numerous great reviews from renown magazines. And it’s the same for the Fortezza Tubeless tire. German RoadBike magazine recognized the balanced performance of the tire. [It] runs very smooth and gives a great sense of security, even on gravel”, concluded their review.  

Getting close with Tubeless

To get the most out of a well performing tubeless tire, one needs, however, a wheel that is optimized for this kind of tire. The rim bead hook of all Scope wheels is shaped to be the perfect fit for the tire bead hook. That way the wheels allow for an easy yet secure mounting of tubeless tires. In addition, the internal rim width of 19 millimeters is designed to work best with 25 to 28 millimeter wide tubeless tires, thus offering both great riding comfort and a maximum sealing capacity. That’s not all, though. Aerodynamic advantages are guaranteed due to the outer rim width of 26 millimeters.

Tubeless setups are getting more and more recognition, both among amateur, professional, and recreational cyclists. They offer the ability to lower air pressure, which results in a better grip and more comfort. Further, they’re a lot more resistant to punctures. Aspects, that many rate as the above mentioned game-changing ones.

Scope has its roots in professional cycling. Using the complete line-up of our R-series wheels in combination with Vredestein’s Fortezza Tubeless Ready tires, Riwal-Readynez have a setup on hand that benefits their way of racing. Not needing to worry in crucial moments can make the difference. And their season to date is proof of that.

Riwal-Readynez uses the following products

Scope R3c

The Scope R3c performs best in the mountains and on challenging terrain.

From 1.398,00 EUR

Scope R4c

The Scope R4c is our outstanding all-rounder, a wheelset without any limitations.

From 1.398,00 EUR

Scope R5

The Scope R5c is our most aerodynamic wheelset, a rider’s favorite.

From 1.398,00 EUR

Photography by Karen M. Edwards and Torsten Christensen

Going the Distance

The natural necessity to shift the focus towards Tubeless

Hailing from Odense, Denmark, Riwal-Readynez has established itself as the strongest outfit in Scandinavia over the last couple of seasons. Since the beginning of the year, the team competes with a Professional Continental license. And it does so with quite some success.

One of the most notable performances came at the Tour de Yorkshire. Former Danish national road champion Alexander Kamp proved his pedigree when he outsprinted reigning Olympic Road Race champion Greg van Avermaet of CCC and Chris Lawless of Ineos to take the win on stage 3, thus putting himself up for a top5 finish in the overall classification of the race.

Another outstanding result is the victory of Andreas Strokbro at the u23 edition of the infamous Ronde van Vlaanderen.

These are only two of the notable results Riwal Readynez was able to score this season. However, they outline the team’s approach towards the races they take to the start. Whenever the riders pin a number on, they aim to be visible, to make the race, to take position and influence the final outcome.

Performance Aspects

To be able to perform well on the highest level of the sport, it needs a fair amount of aspects that need to be factored in and that set the frame for an optimal performance when it counts.

One of these key aspects is the equipment the team and its riders use. With riders from Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the Faroe Islands, the team clearly has a Scandinavian feel to it.

Given the often rainy and cold weather in the northern part of Europe, the riders know how important high quality wheels and puncture proof tires are. Everyone who has been able to go for a road spin in the wet in one of the riders home countries will certainly have experienced how easy it is to puncture with plenty of tiny flintstone splinters to be found on the tarmac. A hassle-free setup for Scandinavian roads is a reliable one for most roads in any other part of Europe. A crucial matter, especially at races.

New Focus

Approaching the 2019 season the team, therefore, made a game-changing decision. Together with the riders, the management chose to use a tubeless optimized wheel setup. And the statistics would prove that decision right. To date, the Riwal Readynez’s 16 professional riders have accumulated more than 60.000 race kilometers, or, in other words, have covered 1.5 times the length of the equator, and only had to lament 25 punctures along the way.

“Our riders are really happy with the setup. The tires have a lot more grip and the fit with the wheels is a not to underestimate part of that, especially with tubeless”, says Jesper Deluer, team mechanic of Riwal-Readynez. “We also have far fewer problems with punctures, than we’ve had in the past with tubular tires.”

The favorite wheelset of the team’s riders is the Scope R5c paired with Vredestein Fortezza Tubeless Ready tires. With a width of 25 millimeter, the tires fit perfectly into the tire bed of our tubeless optimized Scope rims.

“I really enjoy riding the Scope R5c together with the tubeless setup. The setup is a bit heavier than what I’m used to, but once you get some speed, they’re rolling like a dream”, states Torkil Veyhe, one of the teams key domestiques. And Swedish National Road Race champion Lucas Eriksson adds: “I think the wheels are really good, and it’s very exciting to be riding tubeless. The handling of the wheels feels very, very good!”

The R5c has received numerous great reviews from renown magazines. And it’s the same for the Fortezza Tubeless tire. German RoadBike magazine recognized the balanced performance of the tire. [It] runs very smooth and gives a great sense of security, even on gravel”, concluded their review.  

Getting close with Tubeless

To get the most out of a well performing tubeless tire, one needs, however, a wheel that is optimized for this kind of tire. The rim bead hook of all Scope wheels is shaped to be the perfect fit for the tire bead hook. That way the wheels allow for an easy yet secure mounting of tubeless tires. In addition, the internal rim width of 19 millimeters is designed to work best with 25 to 28 millimeter wide tubeless tires, thus offering both great riding comfort and a maximum sealing capacity. That’s not all, though. Aerodynamic advantages are guaranteed due to the outer rim width of 26 millimeters.

Tubeless setups are getting more and more recognition, both among amateur, professional, and recreational cyclists. They offer the ability to lower air pressure, which results in a better grip and more comfort. Further, they’re a lot more resistant to punctures. Aspects, that many rate as the above mentioned game-changing ones.

Scope has its roots in professional cycling. Using the complete line-up of our R-series wheels in combination with Vredestein’s Fortezza Tubeless Ready tires, Riwal-Readynez have a setup on hand that benefits their way of racing. Not needing to worry in crucial moments can make the difference. And their season to date is proof of that.

Riwal-Readynez uses the following products

Scope R3c

The Scope R3c performs best in the mountains and on challenging terrain.

From 1.398,00 EUR

Scope R4c

The Scope R4c is our outstanding all-rounder, a wheelset without any limitations.

From 1.398,00 EUR

Scope R5

The Scope R5c is our most aerodynamic wheelset, a rider’s favorite.

From 1.398,00 EUR

Photography by Karen M. Edwards and Torsten Christensen

Going the Distance

The natural necessity to shift the focus towards Tubeless

Hailing from Odense, Denmark, Riwal-Readynez has established itself as the strongest outfit in Scandinavia over the last couple of seasons. Since the beginning of the year, the team competes with a Professional Continental license. And it does so with quite some success.

One of the most notable performances came at the Tour de Yorkshire. Former Danish national road champion Alexander Kamp proved his pedigree when he outsprinted reigning Olympic Road Race champion Greg van Avermaet of CCC and Chris Lawless of Ineos to take the win on stage 3, thus putting himself up for a top5 finish in the overall classification of the race.

Another outstanding result is the victory of Andreas Strokbro at the u23 edition of the infamous Ronde van Vlaanderen.

These are only two of the notable results Riwal Readynez was able to score this season. However, they outline the team’s approach towards the races they take to the start. Whenever the riders pin a number on, they aim to be visible, to make the race, to take position and influence the final outcome.

Performance Aspects

To be able to perform well on the highest level of the sport, it needs a fair amount of aspects that need to be factored in and that set the frame for an optimal performance when it counts.

One of these key aspects is the equipment the team and its riders use. With riders from Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the Faroe Islands, the team clearly has a Scandinavian feel to it.

Given the often rainy and cold weather in the northern part of Europe, the riders know how important high quality wheels and puncture proof tires are. Everyone who has been able to go for a road spin in the wet in one of the riders home countries will certainly have experienced how easy it is to puncture with plenty of tiny flintstone splinters to be found on the tarmac. A hassle-free setup for Scandinavian roads is a reliable one for most roads in any other part of Europe. A crucial matter, especially at races.

New Focus

Approaching the 2019 season the team, therefore, made a game-changing decision. Together with the riders, the management chose to use a tubeless optimized wheel setup. And the statistics would prove that decision right. To date, the Riwal Readynez’s 16 professional riders have accumulated more than 60.000 race kilometers, or, in other words, have covered 1.5 times the length of the equator, and only had to lament 25 punctures along the way.

“Our riders are really happy with the setup. The tires have a lot more grip and the fit with the wheels is a not to underestimate part of that, especially with tubeless”, says Jesper Deluer, team mechanic of Riwal-Readynez. “We also have far fewer problems with punctures, than we’ve had in the past with tubular tires.”

The favorite wheelset of the team’s riders is the Scope R5c paired with Vredestein Fortezza Tubeless Ready tires. With a width of 25 millimeter, the tires fit perfectly into the tire bed of our tubeless optimized Scope rims.

“I really enjoy riding the Scope R5c together with the tubeless setup. The setup is a bit heavier than what I’m used to, but once you get some speed, they’re rolling like a dream”, states Torkil Veyhe, one of the teams key domestiques. And Swedish National Road Race champion Lucas Eriksson adds: “I think the wheels are really good, and it’s very exciting to be riding tubeless. The handling of the wheels feels very, very good!”

The R5c has received numerous great reviews from renown magazines. And it’s the same for the Fortezza Tubeless tire. German RoadBike magazine recognized the balanced performance of the tire. [It] runs very smooth and gives a great sense of security, even on gravel”, concluded their review.  

Getting close with Tubeless

To get the most out of a well performing tubeless tire, one needs, however, a wheel that is optimized for this kind of tire. The rim bead hook of all Scope wheels is shaped to be the perfect fit for the tire bead hook. That way the wheels allow for an easy yet secure mounting of tubeless tires. In addition, the internal rim width of 19 millimeters is designed to work best with 25 to 28 millimeter wide tubeless tires, thus offering both great riding comfort and a maximum sealing capacity. That’s not all, though. Aerodynamic advantages are guaranteed due to the outer rim width of 26 millimeters.

Tubeless setups are getting more and more recognition, both among amateur, professional, and recreational cyclists. They offer the ability to lower air pressure, which results in a better grip and more comfort. Further, they’re a lot more resistant to punctures. Aspects, that many rate as the above mentioned game-changing ones.

Scope has its roots in professional cycling. Using the complete line-up of our R-series wheels in combination with Vredestein’s Fortezza Tubeless Ready tires, Riwal-Readynez have a setup on hand that benefits their way of racing. Not needing to worry in crucial moments can make the difference. And their season to date is proof of that.

Riwal-Readynez uses the following products

Scope R3c

The Scope R3c performs best in the mountains and on challenging terrain.

From 1.398,00 EUR

Scope R4c

The Scope R4c is our outstanding all-rounder, a wheelset without any limitations.

From 1.398,00 EUR

Scope R5

The Scope R5c is our most aerodynamic wheelset, a rider’s favorite.

From 1.398,00 EUR

Photography by Karen M. Edwards and Torsten Christensen

BREAKING AWAY IN THE ARDENNES

Once the cobbled classics are covered, the professional peloton heads straight into the Ardennes to race La Fleche Wallonne and Liege-Bastogne-Liege, two of the calendars most prolific hilly races.

BREAKING AWAY IN THE ARDENNES

WALLONIE-BRUXELLES SHINES IN IT’S BACKYARD

The Ardennes have it all: steep hills, a stunning scenery, and nail-biting action. This year, the Ardennes had even more of it. Often referred to “the Hardennes”, given the regions challenging nature, Le Fleche Wallone and Liege-Bastogne-Liege offered a menu which couldn’t have been more diverse. 

For local team Wallonie-Bruxelles both races have a high priority. Being held in their backyard, the team and its riders know every corner. Therefore, it’s understandable that the team took to the start with high hopes.

The team geared up, equipping their Scope R4c and R5c wheelsets with Schwalbe’s latest version of their tubeless Pro One. A proven combination.

Liege-Bastogne-Liege

While La Fleche Wallonne saw the riders taking on the course in nice conditions, the weather on Sunday was quite the opposite. Rain and temperatures around 5 degrees made racing atrocious and exhausting for the majority of the peloton. 

Again, the break went early. This time, Wallonie-Bruxelles managed to place Mathijs Paasschens and Kenny Molly in the break. Both stayed out until the final hour of racing, tackling the Cote de Wanne and Cote de Stockaeu ahead of the main contenders.

The challenging terrain of the Ardennes didn’t just make for tough racing but also meant that the equipment was put through its paces. 

Wallonie-Bruxelles managed to came away unscathed. And proved once again that racing tubeless accelerates ambitions.

Featured Products: Scope R4c and R5c

Photography: Kramon Velophoto

BREAKING AWAY IN THE ARDENNES

WALLONIE-BRUXELLES SHINES IN IT’S BACKYARD

The Ardennes have it all: steep hills, a stunning scenery, and nail-biting action. This year, the Ardennes had even more of it. Often referred to “the Hardennes”, given the regions challenging nature, Le Fleche Wallone and Liege-Bastogne-Liege offered a menu which couldn’t have been more diverse. 

For local team Wallonie-Bruxelles both races have a high priority. Being held in their backyard, the team and its riders know every corner. Therefore, it’s understandable that the team took to the start with high hopes.

The team geared up, equipping their Scope R4c and R5c wheelsets with Schwalbe’s latest version of their tubeless Pro One. A proven combination.

Liege-Bastogne-Liege

While La Fleche Wallonne saw the riders taking on the course in nice conditions, the weather on Sunday was quite the opposite. Rain and temperatures around 5 degrees made racing atrocious and exhausting for the majority of the peloton. 

Again, the break went early. This time, Wallonie-Bruxelles managed to place Mathijs Paasschens and Kenny Molly in the break. Both stayed out until the final hour of racing, tackling the Cote de Wanne and Cote de Stockaeu ahead of the main contenders.

The challenging terrain of the Ardennes didn’t just make for tough racing but also meant that the equipment was put through its paces. 

Wallonie-Bruxelles managed to came away unscathed. And proved once again that racing tubeless accelerates ambitions.

Featured Products: Scope R4c and R5c

Photography: Kramon Velophoto

BREAKING AWAY IN THE ARDENNES

WALLONIE-BRUXELLES SHINES IN IT’S BACKYARD

The Ardennes have it all: steep hills, a stunning scenery, and nail-biting action. This year, the Ardennes had even more of it. Often referred to “the Hardennes”, given the regions challenging nature, Le Fleche Wallone and Liege-Bastogne-Liege offered a menu which couldn’t have been more diverse. 

For local team Wallonie-Bruxelles both races have a high priority. Being held in their backyard, the team and its riders know every corner. Therefore, it’s understandable that the team took to the start with high hopes.

The team geared up, equipping their Scope R4c and R5c wheelsets with Schwalbe’s latest version of their tubeless Pro One. A proven combination.

La Fleche Wallonne

Traditionally held during the week, La Fleche Wallonne sort of marks the roll-in for it’s bigger brother, Liege-Bastogne-Liege. 

The peloton has to cover 195 kilometers from Ans to the finish atop the iconic Mur de Huy.

With the thermometer showing nearly 20 degrees, it was always going to be a nice day in the office for the World Tour peloton. It didn’t take long until a handful of riders managed to slip away from the peloton. Among them was Wallonie-Bruxelles neo-pro Tom Wirtgen. The young Luxembourger rode courageously all day, showing off his pedigree.

In the end, the team managed to show itself as active as ever in front of its home crowd.

Liege-Bastogne-Liege

While La Fleche Wallonne saw the riders taking on the course in nice conditions, the weather on Sunday was quite the opposite. Rain and temperatures around 5 degrees made racing atrocious and exhausting for the majority of the peloton. 

Again, the break went early. This time, Wallonie-Bruxelles managed to place Mathijs Paasschens and Kenny Molly in the break. Both stayed out until the final hour of racing, tackling the Cote de Wanne and Cote de Stockaeu ahead of the main contenders.

The challenging terrain of the Ardennes didn’t just make for tough racing but also meant that the equipment was put through its paces. 

Wallonie-Bruxelles managed to came away unscathed. And proved once again that racing tubeless accelerates ambitions.

Featured Products: Scope R4c and R5c

Photography: Kramon Velophoto

Mastering the Belgian Spring

Every year, come spring, some riders will push harder than at any other time during the season. It’s that time of the year that they’ll thrive. It’s the time for the cobbled classics in Belgium. Wallonie-Bruxelles might be an underdog team, but they took their chances throughout the last few weeks, racing as active as it gets.

MASTERING THE BELGIAN SPRING

WALLONIE-BRUXELLES DEFIES THE ODDS

Every year, come spring, some riders will push harder than at any other time during the season. It’s that time of the year that they’ll thrive. It’s the time for the cobbled classics in Belgium. Wallonie-Bruxelles might be an underdog team, but they took their chances throughout the last few weeks, racing as active as it gets.

That’s not all, though. The team is the only professional cycling team that took to the start of the holy month, as March is also known in Belgium, solely racing on tubeless wheels and tires.

In total, the team’s riders accumulated around 10.000 kilometers over seven of the most iconic spring races, and only suffered 2 punctures along the way.

Riding actively, the team left its mark on the cobbled races and proved on one of the roughest testing grounds there is in professional cycling, that the future of the sport doesn’t require tubular set-ups any longer.

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad

The 200 kilometers from Merelbeke to Ninove mark the start of the spring classics season. Being a local team, Wallonie-Bruxelles was motivated to determine how the race would unfold. Riding his first professional season, Tim Wirtgen infiltrated the break of the day before serving as a springboard for Baptist Planckaert’s late surge to the line. The latter tried to steal victory from the pre-race favorites with a solo move but had to settle for 24th at the end of the day, paying tribute to his efforts. Nevertheless, the account was opened, and more was to come from the team.

Le Samyn

Next on the menu was Le Samyn. The classic is traditionally held during the week and known for the atrocious weather, that riders had to face in recent years. This year was no different.

 

Danilith Nokere Koerse

With plenty of World Tour teams lining the start line, the race was another one for the cobble-specialists. However, with the finish line atop the cobbled Nokereberg and its sprinter-friendly character, it was also one that the fast man in the peloton had marked. Wallonie-Bruxelles tried to protect their fastest rider, Justin Jules, by being on the attack all day. A tactic that nearly paid off. Jules galloped over the line in 7th, securing the team’s first top10 placing at the this year’s classics.  

Bredene Koksijde Classic

200 kilometers along the Belgian coastline and plenty of wind always make for interesting racing. And this year was no different. With barely any hill on the menu, it’s the crosswinds that can cause trouble at this race. Wallonie-Bruuxelles flew their flag at the front of the bunch throughout the day, proving their pedigree once again.

 

Driedaagse Brugge-DePanne

The name is misleading and only a reminder of the race’s past. Having been a multi-day stage race, it’s now a 200 kilometer long one-day classic. As part of the World Tour, the race sees a fair amount of classics stars taking to the start, especially the ones with a strong kick. Wallonie-Bruxelles made use of its local knowledge and placed Mathijs Paaschens in the break of the day. His move allowed the rest of the team to watch out for Justin Jules who would cross the line in 5th, just behind the fastest man on the day, the established Dylan Groenewegen (Lotto-Visma).  

E3 BinckBank Classic

The E3 BinckBank Classic is a rehearsal for the Ronde van Vlaanderen, featuring more than just a handful of the same climbs. Given the importance of the race, it was always going to be a hard one. Aksel Nommela and Lionel Thaminiaux, both riding their maiden professional season, jumped into the break of the day to tackle iconic climbs like the Taaienberg, the Paterberg, and the Oude Kwaremont ahead of an elite group that included eventual race-winner Zdenek Stybar (Deceuninck-QuickStep) and Alberto Bettiol (EF Education First), who would go on to win Vlaanderens Mooiste.

Gent-Wevelgem

Just two days after a tough edition of the E3 BinckBank Classic, Gent-Wevelgem saw the strongest riders of the peloton turn out. The race unfolded in a way, how only a handful of people would have guessed. Strong crosswinds forced an early split and saw the main classics contenders racing flat out for nearly the full distance of 250 kilometers. In the end, riders would describe the race as probably their hardest ever.

Technology Proven

We develop all our wheels as a system with the goal to find the best possible balance between aerodynamics, stiffness, durability and weight. Besides testing all wheels in house, we’re also proud to see them being put through their paces at the highest level of the sport, at the Flemish classics.

Wallonie-Bruxelles proved not only that it’s possible to take part in the classics, but to grab these races by their horns and write their stories actively while being fully committed to new technologies. Racing tubeless gave the team a competitive edge.

The unique characteristics of the Scope R4c and R5c wheels provided the riders a hassle- and worry-free setup, one that helped them to accelerate their ambitions during these races.

 

Featured Products: Scope R4c and R5c

Photography: Kramon Velophoto

MASTERING THE BELGIAN SPRING

WALLONIE-BRUXELLES DEFIES THE ODDS

Every year, come spring, some riders will push harder than at any other time during the season. It’s that time of the year that they’ll thrive. It’s the time for the cobbled classics in Belgium. Wallonie-Bruxelles might be an underdog team, but they took their chances throughout the last few weeks, racing as active as it gets.

That’s not all, though. The team is the only professional cycling team that took to the start of the holy month, as March is also known in Belgium, solely racing on tubeless wheels and tires.

In total, the team’s riders accumulated around 10.000 kilometers over seven of the most iconic spring races, and only suffered 2 punctures along the way.

Riding actively, the team left its mark on the cobbled races and proved on one of the roughest testing grounds there is in professional cycling, that the future of the sport doesn’t require tubular set-ups any longer.

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad

The 200 kilometers from Merelbeke to Ninove mark the start of the spring classics season. Being a local team, Wallonie-Bruxelles was motivated to determine how the race would unfold. Riding his first professional season, Tim Wirtgen infiltrated the break of the day before serving as a springboard for Baptist Planckaert’s late surge to the line. The latter tried to steal victory from the pre-race favorites with a solo move but had to settle for 24th at the end of the day, paying tribute to his efforts. Nevertheless, the account was opened, and more was to come from the team.

Le Samyn

Next on the menu was Le Samyn. The classic is traditionally held during the week and known for the atrocious weather, that riders had to face in recent years. This year was no different.

 

Danilith Nokere Koerse

With plenty of World Tour teams lining the start line, the race was another one for the cobble-specialists. However, with the finish line atop the cobbled Nokereberg and its sprinter-friendly character, it was also one that the fast man in the peloton had marked. Wallonie-Bruxelles tried to protect their fastest rider, Justin Jules, by being on the attack all day. A tactic that nearly paid off. Jules galloped over the line in 7th, securing the team’s first top10 placing at the this year’s classics.  

Bredene Koksijde Classic

200 kilometers along the Belgian coastline and plenty of wind always make for interesting racing. And this year was no different. With barely any hill on the menu, it’s the crosswinds that can cause trouble at this race. Wallonie-Bruuxelles flew their flag at the front of the bunch throughout the day, proving their pedigree once again.

 

Driedaagse Brugge-DePanne

The name is misleading and only a reminder of the race’s past. Having been a multi-day stage race, it’s now a 200 kilometer long one-day classic. As part of the World Tour, the race sees a fair amount of classics stars taking to the start, especially the ones with a strong kick. Wallonie-Bruxelles made use of its local knowledge and placed Mathijs Paaschens in the break of the day. His move allowed the rest of the team to watch out for Justin Jules who would cross the line in 5th, just behind the fastest man on the day, the established Dylan Groenewegen (Lotto-Visma).  

E3 BinckBank Classic

The E3 BinckBank Classic is a rehearsal for the Ronde van Vlaanderen, featuring more than just a handful of the same climbs. Given the importance of the race, it was always going to be a hard one. Aksel Nommela and Lionel Thaminiaux, both riding their maiden professional season, jumped into the break of the day to tackle iconic climbs like the Taaienberg, the Paterberg, and the Oude Kwaremont ahead of an elite group that included eventual race-winner Zdenek Stybar (Deceuninck-QuickStep) and Alberto Bettiol (EF Education First), who would go on to win Vlaanderens Mooiste.

Gent-Wevelgem

Just two days after a tough edition of the E3 BinckBank Classic, Gent-Wevelgem saw the strongest riders of the peloton turn out. The race unfolded in a way, how only a handful of people would have guessed. Strong crosswinds forced an early split and saw the main classics contenders racing flat out for nearly the full distance of 250 kilometers. In the end, riders would describe the race as probably their hardest ever.

Technology Proven

We develop all our wheels as a system with the goal to find the best possible balance between aerodynamics, stiffness, durability and weight. Besides testing all wheels in house, we’re also proud to see them being put through their paces at the highest level of the sport, at the Flemish classics.

Wallonie-Bruxelles proved not only that it’s possible to take part in the classics, but to grab these races by their horns and write their stories actively while being fully committed to new technologies. Racing tubeless gave the team a competitive edge.

The unique characteristics of the Scope R4c and R5c wheels provided the riders a hassle- and worry-free setup, one that helped them to accelerate their ambitions during these races.

 

Featured Products: Scope R4c and R5c

Photography: Kramon Velophoto

MASTERING THE BELGIAN SPRING

WALLONIE-BRUXELLES DEFIES THE ODDS

Every year, come spring, some riders will push harder than at any other time during the season. It’s that time of the year that they’ll thrive. It’s the time for the cobbled classics in Belgium. Wallonie-Bruxelles might be an underdog team, but they took their chances throughout the last few weeks, racing as active as it gets.

That’s not all, though. The team is the only professional cycling team that took to the start of the holy month, as March is also known in Belgium, solely racing on tubeless wheels and tires.

In total, the team’s riders accumulated around 10.000 kilometers over seven of the most iconic spring races, and only suffered 2 punctures along the way.

Riding actively, the team left its mark on the cobbled races and proved on one of the roughest testing grounds there is in professional cycling, that the future of the sport doesn’t require tubular set-ups any longer.

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad

The 200 kilometers from Merelbeke to Ninove mark the start of the spring classics season. Being a local team, Wallonie-Bruxelles was motivated to determine how the race would unfold. Riding his first professional season, Tim Wirtgen infiltrated the break of the day before serving as a springboard for Baptist Planckaert’s late surge to the line. The latter tried to steal victory from the pre-race favorites with a solo move but had to settle for 24th at the end of the day, paying tribute to his efforts. Nevertheless, the account was opened, and more was to come from the team.

Le Samyn

Next on the menu was Le Samyn. The classic is traditionally held during the week and known for the atrocious weather, that riders had to face in recent years. This year was no different.

 

Danilith Nokere Koerse

With plenty of World Tour teams lining the start line, the race was another one for the cobble-specialists. However, with the finish line atop the cobbled Nokereberg and its sprinter-friendly character, it was also one that the fast man in the peloton had marked. Wallonie-Bruxelles tried to protect their fastest rider, Justin Jules, by being on the attack all day. A tactic that nearly paid off. Jules galloped over the line in 7th, securing the team’s first top10 placing at the this year’s classics.  

Bredene Koksijde Classic

200 kilometers along the Belgian coastline and plenty of wind always make for interesting racing. And this year was no different. With barely any hill on the menu, it’s the crosswinds that can cause trouble at this race. Wallonie-Bruuxelles flew their flag at the front of the bunch throughout the day, proving their pedigree once again.

 

Driedaagse Brugge-DePanne

The name is misleading and only a reminder of the race’s past. Having been a multi-day stage race, it’s now a 200 kilometer long one-day classic. As part of the World Tour, the race sees a fair amount of classics stars taking to the start, especially the ones with a strong kick. Wallonie-Bruxelles made use of its local knowledge and placed Mathijs Paaschens in the break of the day. His move allowed the rest of the team to watch out for Justin Jules who would cross the line in 5th, just behind the fastest man on the day, the established Dylan Groenewegen (Lotto-Visma).  

E3 BinckBank Classic

The E3 BinckBank Classic is a rehearsal for the Ronde van Vlaanderen, featuring more than just a handful of the same climbs. Given the importance of the race, it was always going to be a hard one. Aksel Nommela and Lionel Thaminiaux, both riding their maiden professional season, jumped into the break of the day to tackle iconic climbs like the Taaienberg, the Paterberg, and the Oude Kwaremont ahead of an elite group that included eventual race-winner Zdenek Stybar (Deceuninck-QuickStep) and Alberto Bettiol (EF Education First), who would go on to win Vlaanderens Mooiste.

Gent-Wevelgem

Just two days after a tough edition of the E3 BinckBank Classic, Gent-Wevelgem saw the strongest riders of the peloton turn out. The race unfolded in a way, how only a handful of people would have guessed. Strong crosswinds forced an early split and saw the main classics contenders racing flat out for nearly the full distance of 250 kilometers. In the end, riders would describe the race as probably their hardest ever.

Technology Proven

We develop all our wheels as a system with the goal to find the best possible balance between aerodynamics, stiffness, durability and weight. Besides testing all wheels in house, we’re also proud to see them being put through their paces at the highest level of the sport, at the Flemish classics.

Wallonie-Bruxelles proved not only that it’s possible to take part in the classics, but to grab these races by their horns and write their stories actively while being fully committed to new technologies. Racing tubeless gave the team a competitive edge.

The unique characteristics of the Scope R4c and R5c wheels provided the riders a hassle- and worry-free setup, one that helped them to accelerate their ambitions during these races.

 

Featured Products: Scope R4c and R5c

Photography: Kramon Velophoto

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad and the tubeless approach of Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles

Last Saturday, Cycling Team Wallonie Bruxelles became the first team to race a World Tour classic on a tubeless setup. All riders committed to the new technology, having been able to test is throughout the earlier part of the season.

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad

The Tubeless Approach of Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles

“Cycling is coming home.” At least that is what a lot of people were saying ahead of Omloop Het Nieuwsblad. The Belgian classic marks the traditional opener to the cobbled season. Given its World Tour status, the race attracts the strongest classics riders of the peloton, as it gives them the chance to test their legs against each other on their preferred terrain for the first time of the season. 

In the end, Zdenek Stybar of Deceuninck-QuickStep outfoxed his rivals to take the win from an elite group that also included Olympic champion Greg van Avermaet of CCC. And while the big teams and their captains were the expected ones to shine, it was Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles that left its mark on the race. 

The small Belgian team received a wildcard to race the iconic Omloop Het Nieuwsblad, but wasn’t shy to place neo-professional Tom Wirtgen in the early break. The 23-year old stayed away for nearly 150 kilometers. And with roughly 50 kilometers to go, he helped launch the solo attack of Baptiste Planckaert. The latter would end up in 24th position, finishing together with former winner Ian Stannard of Sky, less than 2 minutes behind solo winner Stybar.

The team rode attentively all day and what makes their effort even more remarkable is the fact that they raced tubeless. As the first team to completely do so at a World Tour race.

Having been able to test the system over the last couple of months, the team knew which tire pressures to use when hitting the cobbles. And it gave them added confidence. Should one of the riders puncture, he’d be able to continue racing for a while, thus staying in the race and keep the chances for the team high.

Cycling Team Wallonie Bruxelles races on our tubeless optimized Scope R4c and R5c wheels.

Kristof Ramon was there for us to capture the race for us. 

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad

The Tubeless Approach of Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles

“Cycling is coming home.” At least that is what a lot of people were saying ahead of Omloop Het Nieuwsblad. The Belgian classic marks the traditional opener to the cobbled season. Given its World Tour status, the race attracts the strongest classics riders of the peloton, as it gives them the chance to test their legs against each other on their preferred terrain for the first time of the season. 

In the end, Zdenek Stybar of Deceuninck-QuickStep outfoxed his rivals to take the win from an elite group that also included Olympic champion Greg van Avermaet of CCC. And while the big teams and their captains were the expected ones to shine, it was Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles that left its mark on the race. 

The small Belgian team received a wildcard to race the iconic Omloop Het Nieuwsblad, but wasn’t shy to place neo-professional Tom Wirtgen in the early break. The 23-year old stayed away for nearly 150 kilometers. And with roughly 50 kilometers to go, he helped launch the solo attack of Baptiste Planckaert. The latter would end up in 24th position, finishing together with former winner Ian Stannard of Sky, less than 2 minutes behind solo winner Stybar.

The team rode attentively all day and what makes their effort even more remarkable is the fact that they raced tubeless. As the first team to completely do so at a World Tour race.

Having been able to test the system over the last couple of months, the team knew which tire pressures to use when hitting the cobbles. And it gave them added confidence. Should one of the riders puncture, he’d be able to continue racing for a while, thus staying in the race and keep the chances for the team high.

Cycling Team Wallonie Bruxelles races on our tubeless optimized Scope R4c and R5c wheels.

Kristof Ramon was there for us to capture the race for us. 

Omloop Het Nieuwsblad

The Tubeless Approach of Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles

“Cycling is coming home.” At least that is what a lot of people were saying ahead of Omloop Het Nieuwsblad. The Belgian classic marks the traditional opener to the cobbled season. Given its World Tour status, the race attracts the strongest classics riders of the peloton, as it gives them the chance to test their legs against each other on their preferred terrain for the first time of the season. 

In the end, Zdenek Stybar of Deceuninck-QuickStep outfoxed his rivals to take the win from an elite group that also included Olympic champion Greg van Avermaet of CCC. And while the big teams and their captains were the expected ones to shine, it was Cycling Team Wallonie-Bruxelles that left its mark on the race. 

The small Belgian team received a wildcard to race the iconic Omloop Het Nieuwsblad, but wasn’t shy to place neo-professional Tom Wirtgen in the early break. The 23-year old stayed away for nearly 150 kilometers. And with roughly 50 kilometers to go, he helped launch the solo attack of Baptiste Planckaert. The latter would end up in 24th position, finishing together with former winner Ian Stannard of Sky, less than 2 minutes behind solo winner Stybar.

The team rode attentively all day and what makes their effort even more remarkable is the fact that they raced tubeless. As the first team to completely do so at a World Tour race.

Having been able to test the system over the last couple of months, the team knew which tire pressures to use when hitting the cobbles. And it gave them added confidence. Should one of the riders puncture, he’d be able to continue racing for a while, thus staying in the race and keep the chances for the team high.

Cycling Team Wallonie Bruxelles races on our tubeless optimized Scope R4c and R5c wheels.

Kristof Ramon was there for us to capture the race for us. 

Pinning on a number: How to prepare yourself for your competitive highlight

Together with Calle Friberg we will provide you a couple of tips and tricks on how you can optimize your training. In this first article we’ll discuss the basics of preparing yourself for a long distance event, a MTB marathon in particular.

PINNING ON A NUMBER

HOW TO PREPARE YOURSELF FOR YOUR COMPETITIVE HIGHLIGHT

The 2019 season is about to take momentum. The first races are already history, both on and off the road. Some of you might already have tasted some early success. For most of us, however, the big goals still lay ahead.

Together with Calle Friberg, we will provide you a couple of tips and tricks on how you can optimize your training. In this first article, we’ll discuss the basics of preparing yourself for a long distance event, a MTB marathon in particular.

Have you ever thought about racing a MTB marathon event? Well, it’s not as difficult, as it might seem. And with the right preparation, you’ll get there. And even further: you’ll finish the event successfully. With the right training and equipment, you’ll reach that finish line!

There are two types of MTB marathon events: one-day events and stage races. Calle is a seasoned pro who has experience success both of them. The multiple Swedish national champion has won the Marathon World Series race Roc des Alpes and has finished races like the Cape Epic, and the Swiss Epic on numerous occasions.

Defining the goals and sharpening the focus

Not everyone likes to focus on data at all time. Doing so can add a lot of pressure. However, this article aims to give you an overview of what can be done to reach your goals. No matter if these are set around crossing the line at the front of the pack, or just around finishing the race. In the end, it shall provide you with a certain training structure, with notes about different training aspects. And it shall show you that and how it’s possible to train for long-distance events, even with your normal working hours.

The agenda outlined in this article is fairly uncomplicated. It only requires your commitment to training hours and intensity. But before looking at it in more detail, let’s emphasize on a few key points.

While it’s one story to stay fit throughout the year, it’s another when it comes to racing. Pick your key event and then start planning your training around it. Once you know the date, start to plan your training. To get the most out of yourself come race day, start your specific training at least 12 weeks in advance and try to combine your long rides with some technical exercises. Also, find a good rhythm and structure for your interval sessions and mix-up sessions on the turbo trainer with sessions on the road.

There’s no golden rule to be successful come race-day. There are too many variables involved that can spoil a great result. That doesn’t mean, though, that one can’t try to be as prepared as possible. Once decided, try to stick to your training plan. Even if this means that you have to face bad weather. Who knows what conditions race day will bring?

You should also make sure to try out your intended race nutrition on longer rides to find out what works for you and what not. Lastly, make the right investment choices. Investing in good equipment can be a game changer. A good frameset or purpose-built wheelset can be a game changer. One, that you’ll likely be glad about when the adrenaline kicks in and it’s go-time.

Training with normal working hours

As already mentioned, this article tries to provide you with an overview of what you can do. It does, though, not replace a coach.

Competing while working normal hours during the week can be challenging. Not everyone has the luxurious situation of having 20 hours available to hone the form. It is, therefore, that you’ll find two options in the table below. Depending on how much time you have available, these will serve as a guide.

Most of the turbo sessions below are based around interval sessions. A suitable interval for zone 2 sessions is a so-called power pyramid. For zone 3 sessions over-under intervals are a great way to improve your fitness levels. Make sure you find a good mix that works for you.


DOWNLOAD THE PLAN

Test yourself

Some literature recommends to start your training blocks with a test, often referring to a FTP-test to find out your functional threshold power, or in other words, to find out the power level that you can sustain for 1 hour. While this is a good indicator to figure out your training zones, you shouldn’t underestimate your heart rate. Also, if you don’t have, want or can afford a powermeter, try to make use of your heart-rate monitor. It’ll pay off on your way to the start line.

(By the way, if you prefer to race on the road. The tips given in this article will also help you to get through any road race you’ll take to the start.)

 

Calle Friberg’s bike

Frame: Scott Spark RC

Groupset: Sram Eagle XX1

Wheels: Scope O2

Tires: Maxxis

Images: Sportograf

Featured Products: Scope O2

PINNING ON A NUMBER

HOW TO PREPARE YOURSELF FOR YOUR COMPETITIVE HIGHLIGHT

The 2019 season is about to take momentum. The first races are already history, both on and off the road. Some of you might already have tasted some early success. For most of us, however, the big goals still lay ahead.

Together with Calle Friberg, we will provide you a couple of tips and tricks on how you can optimize your training. In this first article, we’ll discuss the basics of preparing yourself for a long distance event, a MTB marathon in particular.

Have you ever thought about racing a MTB marathon event? Well, it’s not as difficult, as it might seem. And with the right preparation, you’ll get there. And even further: you’ll finish the event successfully. With the right training and equipment, you’ll reach that finish line!

There are two types of MTB marathon events: one-day events and stage races. Calle is a seasoned pro who has experience success both of them. The multiple Swedish national champion has won the Marathon World Series race Roc des Alpes and has finished races like the Cape Epic, and the Swiss Epic on numerous occasions.

Defining the goals and sharpening the focus

Not everyone likes to focus on data at all time. Doing so can add a lot of pressure. However, this article aims to give you an overview of what can be done to reach your goals. No matter if these are set around crossing the line at the front of the pack, or just around finishing the race. In the end, it shall provide you with a certain training structure, with notes about different training aspects. And it shall show you that and how it’s possible to train for long-distance events, even with your normal working hours.

The agenda outlined in this article is fairly uncomplicated. It only requires your commitment to training hours and intensity. But before looking at it in more detail, let’s emphasize on a few key points.

While it’s one story to stay fit throughout the year, it’s another when it comes to racing. Pick your key event and then start planning your training around it. Once you know the date, start to plan your training. To get the most out of yourself come race day, start your specific training at least 12 weeks in advance and try to combine your long rides with some technical exercises. Also, find a good rhythm and structure for your interval sessions and mix-up sessions on the turbo trainer with sessions on the road.

There’s no golden rule to be successful come race-day. There are too many variables involved that can spoil a great result. That doesn’t mean, though, that one can’t try to be as prepared as possible. Once decided, try to stick to your training plan. Even if this means that you have to face bad weather. Who knows what conditions race day will bring?

You should also make sure to try out your intended race nutrition on longer rides to find out what works for you and what not. Lastly, make the right investment choices. Investing in good equipment can be a game changer. A good frameset or purpose-built wheelset can be a game changer. One, that you’ll likely be glad about when the adrenaline kicks in and it’s go-time.

Training with normal working hours

As already mentioned, this article tries to provide you with an overview of what you can do. It does, though, not replace a coach.

Competing while working normal hours during the week can be challenging. Not everyone has the luxurious situation of having 20 hours available to hone the form. It is, therefore, that you’ll find two options in the table below. Depending on how much time you have available, these will serve as a guide.

Most of the turbo sessions below are based around interval sessions. A suitable interval for zone 2 sessions is a so-called power pyramid. For zone 3 sessions over-under intervals are a great way to improve your fitness levels. Make sure you find a good mix that works for you.


DOWNLOAD THE PLAN

Test yourself

Some literature recommends to start your training blocks with a test, often referring to a FTP-test to find out your functional threshold power, or in other words, to find out the power level that you can sustain for 1 hour. While this is a good indicator to figure out your training zones, you shouldn’t underestimate your heart rate. Also, if you don’t have, want or can afford a powermeter, try to make use of your heart-rate monitor. It’ll pay off on your way to the start line.

(By the way, if you prefer to race on the road. The tips given in this article will also help you to get through any road race you’ll take to the start.)

 

Calle Friberg’s bike

Frame: Scott Spark RC

Groupset: Sram Eagle XX1

Wheels: Scope O2

Tires: Maxxis

Images: Sportograf

Featured Products: Scope O2

PINNING ON A NUMBER

HOW TO PREPARE YOURSELF FOR YOUR COMPETITIVE HIGHLIGHT

The 2019 season is about to take momentum. The first races are already history, both on and off the road. Some of you might already have tasted some early success. For most of us, however, the big goals still lay ahead.

Together with Calle Friberg, we will provide you a couple of tips and tricks on how you can optimize your training. In this first article, we’ll discuss the basics of preparing yourself for a long distance event, a MTB marathon in particular.

Have you ever thought about racing a MTB marathon event? Well, it’s not as difficult, as it might seem. And with the right preparation, you’ll get there. And even further: you’ll finish the event successfully. With the right training and equipment, you’ll reach that finish line!

There are two types of MTB marathon events: one-day events and stage races. Calle is a seasoned pro who has experience success both of them. The multiple Swedish national champion has won the Marathon World Series race Roc des Alpes and has finished races like the Cape Epic, and the Swiss Epic on numerous occasions.

Defining the goals and sharpening the focus

Not everyone likes to focus on data at all time. Doing so can add a lot of pressure. However, this article aims to give you an overview of what can be done to reach your goals. No matter if these are set around crossing the line at the front of the pack, or just around finishing the race. In the end, it shall provide you with a certain training structure, with notes about different training aspects. And it shall show you that and how it’s possible to train for long-distance events, even with your normal working hours.

The agenda outlined in this article is fairly uncomplicated. It only requires your commitment to training hours and intensity. But before looking at it in more detail, let’s emphasize on a few key points.

While it’s one story to stay fit throughout the year, it’s another when it comes to racing. Pick your key event and then start planning your training around it. Once you know the date, start to plan your training. To get the most out of yourself come race day, start your specific training at least 12 weeks in advance and try to combine your long rides with some technical exercises. Also, find a good rhythm and structure for your interval sessions and mix-up sessions on the turbo trainer with sessions on the road.

There’s no golden rule to be successful come race-day. There are too many variables involved that can spoil a great result. That doesn’t mean, though, that one can’t try to be as prepared as possible. Once decided, try to stick to your training plan. Even if this means that you have to face bad weather. Who knows what conditions race day will bring?

You should also make sure to try out your intended race nutrition on longer rides to find out what works for you and what not. Lastly, make the right investment choices. Investing in good equipment can be a game changer. A good frameset or purpose-built wheelset can be a game changer. One, that you’ll likely be glad about when the adrenaline kicks in and it’s go-time.

Training with normal working hours

As already mentioned, this article tries to provide you with an overview of what you can do. It does, though, not replace a coach.

Competing while working normal hours during the week can be challenging. Not everyone has the luxurious situation of having 20 hours available to hone the form. It is, therefore, that you’ll find two options in the table below. Depending on how much time you have available, these will serve as a guide.

Most of the turbo sessions below are based around interval sessions. A suitable interval for zone 2 sessions is a so-called power pyramid. For zone 3 sessions over-under intervals are a great way to improve your fitness levels. Make sure you find a good mix that works for you.


DOWNLOAD THE PLAN

Test yourself

Some literature recommends to start your training blocks with a test, often referring to a FTP-test to find out your functional threshold power, or in other words, to find out the power level that you can sustain for 1 hour. While this is a good indicator to figure out your training zones, you shouldn’t underestimate your heart rate. Also, if you don’t have, want or can afford a powermeter, try to make use of your heart-rate monitor. It’ll pay off on your way to the start line.

(By the way, if you prefer to race on the road. The tips given in this article will also help you to get through any road race you’ll take to the start.)

 

Calle Friberg’s bike

Frame: Scott Spark RC

Groupset: Sram Eagle XX1

Wheels: Scope O2

Tires: Maxxis

Images: Sportograf

Featured Products: Scope O2